Endless forms of beauty
1803
notes

infinity / zero

infinity / zero

(Source: beesandbombs, via thomortiz)

90
notes
germanpostwarmodern:

Maison d’arrêt (1965-69) in Fleury-Mérogis, France, by Guillaume Gillet

germanpostwarmodern:

Maison d’arrêt (1965-69) in Fleury-Mérogis, France, by Guillaume Gillet

(Source: citechaillot.fr, via michaelvel)

66
notes
anuglybeauty:

The photo by Martin Munkácsi that inspired Henri Cartier-Bresson

anuglybeauty:

The photo by Martin Munkácsi that inspired Henri Cartier-Bresson

162
notes

(via thomortiz)

682
notes
1
notes
Paolo Roversi

Paolo Roversi

61
notes

The Seagram Building, 375 Park Avenue, New York, 1958 Mies van der Rohe with Philip Johnson

The Seagram Building, 375 Park Avenue, New York, 1958
Mies van der Rohe with Philip Johnson

(Source: tgphipps, via acidadebranca)

54
notes
boscdanjou:

Pietrarubbia 01
Detail of The Pietrarubbia Group: il fondamento, l’uso, il rapporto (1975–76) by italian sculptor Arnaldo Pomodoro (b. 1926), in the collection of the Storm King Art Center, New York.
Pomodoro has described The Pietrarubbia Group as “a vision of an archaic settlement.” With its visual references to ancient burial traditions and hieroglyphics, the work commemorates the history and crumbling beauty of the nearly abandoned village for which it is named. The Pietrarubbia Group comprises a patio upon which stand two grand, slab-like bronze doors that visitors can move, providing access to the work’s interior. Expansive areas of the doors and the wall beyond them are incised with patterns that resemble ancient signs or writing, giving symbolic voice to the forgotten society that once occupied Pietrarubbia. The first line of Eugenio Montale’s poem Lo sai <You know) is inscribed on one of the doors:
Lo sai: debbo riperderti e non posso (“You know: I must lose you again, and I cannot”)

boscdanjou:

Pietrarubbia 01

Detail of The Pietrarubbia Group: il fondamento, l’uso, il rapporto (1975–76) by italian sculptor Arnaldo Pomodoro (b. 1926), in the collection of the Storm King Art Center, New York.

Pomodoro has described The Pietrarubbia Group as “a vision of an archaic settlement.” With its visual references to ancient burial traditions and hieroglyphics, the work commemorates the history and crumbling beauty of the nearly abandoned village for which it is named. The Pietrarubbia Group comprises a patio upon which stand two grand, slab-like bronze doors that visitors can move, providing access to the work’s interior. Expansive areas of the doors and the wall beyond them are incised with patterns that resemble ancient signs or writing, giving symbolic voice to the forgotten society that once occupied Pietrarubbia. The first line of Eugenio Montale’s poem Lo sai <You know) is inscribed on one of the doors:

Lo sai: debbo riperderti e non posso (“You know: I must lose you again, and I cannot”)

(via thomortiz)

26
notes
Toledo

Toledo

(via infiniteinterior)

440
notes
scandinaviancollectors:

The Farnsworth House by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, designed for Dr Edith Farnsworth in 1946. Photograph by Peter Guthrie. / Flickr

scandinaviancollectors:

The Farnsworth House by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, designed for Dr Edith Farnsworth in 1946. Photograph by Peter Guthrie. / Flickr

(via acidadebranca)

4460
notes

(Source: kogumarecord, via arquitecturb)

207
notes

(Source: nowaves, via luuvalo)

434
notes

(Source: sekigan, via randomghost)

305
notes
Gian Paolo Valenti. Architecture D’Aujourd’Hui, 1962

Gian Paolo ValentiArchitecture D’Aujourd’Hui, 1962

(Source: rndrd.com, via 550bc)

23
notes

(Source: ffffound.com, via ffffffound)

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